Jar listing utility--Java archive file tool. Handling import errors easily in 4 steps.

Here is a quick example on how to get a database of what is contained in jars:
Step
1 of 4) Create a file containing:
#!/bin/bash
jarfolder=/usr/share
jarlist=/tmp/jarlist.txt
declare -a jarclass
find $jarfolder -name "*.jar" > $jarlist
for jarfile in `cat $jarlist`;
do
jarname=`basename $jarfile`;
jarfolder=`dirname $jarfile`;

jarclass=( $( jar -tvf $jarfile | awk '{ print $8 }' ) )
for aclass in "${jarclass[@]}"
do
echo $jarname $jarfolder $aclass;
done
done

2 of 4) Edit top 2 lines if needed/wanted.

3 of 4) Run the script and capture the output. You will get output like this:
maven-core-2.0.6-uber.jar /usr/share/maven/lib org/apache/maven/wagon/events/SessionEvent.class
maven-core-2.0.6-uber.jar /usr/share/maven/lib org/apache/maven/wagon/events/TransferEventSupport.class
maven-core-2.0.6-uber.jar /usr/share/maven/lib org/apache/maven/wagon/events/SessionEventSupport.class
maven-core-2.0.6-uber.jar /usr/share/maven/lib org/apache/maven/wagon/resource/Resource.class
maven-core-2.0.6-uber.jar /usr/share/maven/lib org/apache/maven/wagon/Wagon$1.class
maven-core-2.0.6-uber.jar /usr/share/maven/lib org/apache/maven/wagon/Wagon.class

Note: The list has 3 fields: Jar file name, Jar path, Class name.

4) Import the output into Open Office.
You will be able to filter all the class names based on it's name or the name of the jar file. Then you can add the path to your class path.

I hope this helps maintenance developers everywhere.